Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for January, 2011

*This post was started a few mos back.  I finally got around to finishing it.  😉

As I sit here and type I will end up getting up about 10 or so times, and I probably won’t finish this post without saving it for at least 2-3 days.  Dinner is in the process of being made, I am supervising kids doing homework, watching the baby monitor as the little one wriggles around fitfully trying to avoid her afternoon nap, doing laundry and keeping an ear out for the sounds of dogs misbehaving.  They do that a lot lately, but that’s another post entirely.

It’s cold outside and we just put up our tree.  It’s times like these when I feel very blessed to be able to be at home with my children.  Being a mom comes with some of the most complex of feelings.  You can be so incredibly thankful for the ability to be a mom, so grateful for the precious gifts that come along with motherhood; yet you can feel less-than, utterly behind in everything you do, not good enough, the most tired you’ve ever been in your life, unattractive and just plain worn out.

It’s no secret that motherhood and the art of mothering is not valued much these days.  Try explaining to your boss that you need to leave early because your child is sick, or worse yet try calling in to work when you have a sick child.  Stand in line with your children while waiting to board a flight.  Try to wrangle a screaming toddler who is having a fit in the center of the grocery store and you will feel the eyes upon you.  You can feel the loathing, the disapproval, the general dislike. It’s a common thing nowadays in our society, to look down upon having children and being a mother, much less a stay-at-home mom.  Which is in large part why our society is generally spiraling down the crapper, in my opinion.  The value needs to be out back where it belongs.   Not on the almighty dollar but on caring.  On respecting mothers for all they do rather than making them feel like second-class citizens.  How many times have we as mothers apologized to someone for something having to do with raising our children?  Your child is crying while you’re in the checkout line at the grocery store and you can hear the people behind you commenting.  People generally have an intolerance for mothers, children, mothering and motherhood in general in our society.  I wholeheartedly believe this.  I actually had a dr refuse to see me because I brought my one-month-old with me for the consult (which included no exam) and he began to twitch in his carseat and made a whimper.  The dr looked at me in exasperation, got up and said, “I can’t work like this.”  He left, instructing me to come back when I had a babysitter.

So is it any wonder why we mothers feel so worthless at times?  So unappreciated?  We are undoubtedly doing THE single most important and most difficult job there is to do, so WHY is it not seen for what it is and valued as such?  It has been said many times; how much moms would be worth $-wise if we collected a paycheck for everything we did.  How much does a Chauffeur/Personal Shopper/Personal Chef/Life Coach/Accountant/Personal Shopper/Nanny/Teacher/Manager/QC Supervisor/Housekeeper/Motivational Speaker/Nurse make?  Add all of that up (I’m sure I’ve forgotten something) and get back with me on how I’d be THE richest person on the planet.  Do I command that respect?  No.  In fact, moms end up paying far more than they will ever see in return.  We worry, we give ourselves headaches and backaches and we age far faster than we should.  We give of our bodies, our souls, our hearts.  We give everything.  That’s what moms do.  Go thank your mom.  Hell, stop any mom on the street who looks like she’s about ready to snap, and tell her she’s doing a great job.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »